Banks wants to mine 290,000 tonnes of coal from Shotton site

The Advertiser Series: Mark Dowdall, Banks’ environment and community director Mark Dowdall, Banks’ environment and community director

A MINING firm says it hopes to protect 150 North-East jobs through plans to extract hundreds of thousands of tonnes of coal from the region.

Banks says it wants to mine about 290,000 additional tonnes of coal at its surface mine in Shotton, Northumberland.

The company has submitted the plans to Northumberland County Council and says it wants to work on an area to the west of its Shotton mine, known as Shotton Triangle.

The work would take two years, with bosses saying the entire site will be restored by October 2019.

Banks has operated Shotton mine since 2008, and says that, and its Brenkley Lane surface mine, in Newcastle, employs more than 200 workers, contributing about £35m to the region's economy every year.

A decision on the planning application is expected later this year.

Mark Dowdall, Banks’ environment and community director, says: “Coal will remain a central part of the UK’s energy mix for the foreseeable future, with production from sites such as Shotton and Brenkley Lane being far more desirable than relying on coal imports.”

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

11:21am Wed 15 Jan 14

S Leary says...

“When Mark Dowdall says

“Coal will remain a central part of the UK’s energy mix for the foreseeable future, with production from sites such as Shotton and Brenkley Lane being far more desirable than relying on coal imports.”

he may be exaggerating this rather rosy picture he presents about the future prospects for Coal.

When discussing the Energy Bill in the House Of commons in December, Michael Fallon, the Energy Minister told the House

“Our analysis is consistent with that outlook and shows that unabated coal generation will make up just 7% of total generation by 2020 and 3% by 2025, and probably 0% by 2030. There is no evidence at the moment of a large number of operators planning to upgrade their coal plants, but we should not rule out the possibility that one or two might do so.”

Recent research published by the Loose Anti Opencast Network (LAON) translates what this decline means for the Coal Industry. LAON’s projections, based on Department of Energy and Climate Change figures, are that coal usage for power generation purposes is going to decline from 40.5m tonnes in 2011 to 12.9 m tonnes in 2020, a drop of nearly 70% . By then, LAON argues in its Briefing Note entitled ‘Assessing the Need for Coal’, free to download from this web page:

http://coalaction.or
g.uk/wp-content/uplo
ads/2014/01/Finak-C1
-ASSESSING-THE-NEED-
FOR-COAL.pdf ,

that, based on present trends, the UK will be producing more coal than it will be able to burn in the remaining power stations. This is why LAON has launched its ‘Make Coal a ‘Special Case’ Campaign. More details of this can be found here:

http://www.indymedia
.org.uk/en/2014/01/5
14731.html

Based on these announcements and projections, coal is not going to remain central to providing the UK with energy. This must surely weaken the claim that it is new opencast sites are needed.
“When Mark Dowdall says “Coal will remain a central part of the UK’s energy mix for the foreseeable future, with production from sites such as Shotton and Brenkley Lane being far more desirable than relying on coal imports.” he may be exaggerating this rather rosy picture he presents about the future prospects for Coal. When discussing the Energy Bill in the House Of commons in December, Michael Fallon, the Energy Minister told the House “Our analysis is consistent with that outlook and shows that unabated coal generation will make up just 7% of total generation by 2020 and 3% by 2025, and probably 0% by 2030. There is no evidence at the moment of a large number of operators planning to upgrade their coal plants, but we should not rule out the possibility that one or two might do so.” Recent research published by the Loose Anti Opencast Network (LAON) translates what this decline means for the Coal Industry. LAON’s projections, based on Department of Energy and Climate Change figures, are that coal usage for power generation purposes is going to decline from 40.5m tonnes in 2011 to 12.9 m tonnes in 2020, a drop of nearly 70% . By then, LAON argues in its Briefing Note entitled ‘Assessing the Need for Coal’, free to download from this web page: http://coalaction.or g.uk/wp-content/uplo ads/2014/01/Finak-C1 -ASSESSING-THE-NEED- FOR-COAL.pdf , that, based on present trends, the UK will be producing more coal than it will be able to burn in the remaining power stations. This is why LAON has launched its ‘Make Coal a ‘Special Case’ Campaign. More details of this can be found here: http://www.indymedia .org.uk/en/2014/01/5 14731.html Based on these announcements and projections, coal is not going to remain central to providing the UK with energy. This must surely weaken the claim that it is new opencast sites are needed. S Leary

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree