Vandals strike again at Christmas tree fence

The Advertiser Series: Vandals strike again at Christmas tree fence Vandals strike again at Christmas tree fence

THE fence around Durham’s Christmas tree has been vandalised for a second time in weeks.

Police believe the damage was done by someone who tried to climb the tree, in Durham Market Place.

The incident happened between 10pm on Thursday, December 5, and 8am on Friday, December 6.

No-one has been arrested and there are no suspects.

The fence was first damaged shortly after it was erected in late November.

Anyone with information on the latest incident is asked to call Durham Police on 101 and ask for PC Brown at Durham City police station.

Comments (3)

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7:38pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Nicholas_Till says...

Vandalism can come more serious than trying to climb a Christmas tree. But as far as I myself could see (which obviously wasn't everything), vandalism was notably absent from at least the bottom end of the Market Place before Durham City Vision and DCC reduced the Market Place to its present state. It was as if the combination of dignity and friendliness of that Victorian civic area gave people a sense of belonging as they passed through, lingered or stopped there, and a disinclination to do it damage - whether they were late-night drinkers, kids sitting on the statue steps, whoever.

My belief is that the real underlying purpose of the revamp, all the time, was to destroy this sense of belonging, and to turn the Market Place into an area that would snuff out such a sense in anyone. It has been the work of an enemy. We''ve heard the shifting pretexts for doing it - the 'large events', whatever they've actually amounted to, and the rest - and they are like so many fig leaves, fast shrivelling and scattering now. We can see it for what it is - and if we can clear-sightedly counteract its effects on ourselves, so much the better. They were inflicted to do us harm - no less.
Vandalism can come more serious than trying to climb a Christmas tree. But as far as I myself could see (which obviously wasn't everything), vandalism was notably absent from at least the bottom end of the Market Place before Durham City Vision and DCC reduced the Market Place to its present state. It was as if the combination of dignity and friendliness of that Victorian civic area gave people a sense of belonging as they passed through, lingered or stopped there, and a disinclination to do it damage - whether they were late-night drinkers, kids sitting on the statue steps, whoever. My belief is that the real underlying purpose of the revamp, all the time, was to destroy this sense of belonging, and to turn the Market Place into an area that would snuff out such a sense in anyone. It has been the work of an enemy. We''ve heard the shifting pretexts for doing it - the 'large events', whatever they've actually amounted to, and the rest - and they are like so many fig leaves, fast shrivelling and scattering now. We can see it for what it is - and if we can clear-sightedly counteract its effects on ourselves, so much the better. They were inflicted to do us harm - no less. Nicholas_Till

7:57pm Thu 12 Dec 13

roaduser98 says...

Maybe you should also add the amount of damage to the lighting and bollards and concrete seating where it is an on going task for the repair team to fix and replace any damage. The sight of those £1000 litter bins is another own goal for the 20-20 vision fiasco. The bollards which are to prevent vehicles from entering the 'Display Area' are so flimsy that a articulated delivery lorry can flatten them in one go. This central area has now become a constant work in progress no wonder the vandals can't differentiate their activities from those of the council.
Maybe you should also add the amount of damage to the lighting and bollards and concrete seating where it is an on going task for the repair team to fix and replace any damage. The sight of those £1000 litter bins is another own goal for the 20-20 vision fiasco. The bollards which are to prevent vehicles from entering the 'Display Area' are so flimsy that a articulated delivery lorry can flatten them in one go. This central area has now become a constant work in progress no wonder the vandals can't differentiate their activities from those of the council. roaduser98

8:13pm Thu 12 Dec 13

roaduser98 says...

Remember the criticism at the removal of the curbstones on saddler and silver street. Now it has become a daily battle field of drivers trying to persuade pedestrians to get off the roadway so they can speed up to the cathedral. Why do we need the number of journeys made by the cathedral bus? Most times of the day it appears to be devoid of passengers other than those people on a circular tour. Why allow any vehicles into this area at all during 10am to say 4pm? Why do the security money delivery vans have to park on the edge of the market square? This presents an extremely dangerous hazard for pedestrians and other road users.
Oh well they maybe need the same 20-20 vision as the council consultants who dreamed up this fiasco!!!
Remember the criticism at the removal of the curbstones on saddler and silver street. Now it has become a daily battle field of drivers trying to persuade pedestrians to get off the roadway so they can speed up to the cathedral. Why do we need the number of journeys made by the cathedral bus? Most times of the day it appears to be devoid of passengers other than those people on a circular tour. Why allow any vehicles into this area at all during 10am to say 4pm? Why do the security money delivery vans have to park on the edge of the market square? This presents an extremely dangerous hazard for pedestrians and other road users. Oh well they maybe need the same 20-20 vision as the council consultants who dreamed up this fiasco!!! roaduser98

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