Housing and shop proposal for Ferryhill fields

The Advertiser Series: NO NEW HOUSES: Objectors to plans for 200  new homes and a shop at Southside just off Dean Road, Ferryhill Picture: SARAH CALDECOTT NO NEW HOUSES: Objectors to plans for 200 new homes and a shop at Southside just off Dean Road, Ferryhill Picture: SARAH CALDECOTT

PROTESTORS have launched a campaign to stave off a developer which is eyeing up fields on the edge of their town for houses and a shop.

Cumbria-based Story Homes wants to build 200 houses and a 1,600 sq m food store on land to the south of Ferryhill.

The land, behind Dean Road and Southside, is currently agricultural fields and has been identified as a potential site for housing in the County Durham Plan, which sets out new development across the county.

But some residents of Ferryhill plan to fight the proposal with a petition and objections if and when a planning application is made to Durham County Council.

Last year, during consultation for the county plan, Ferryhill Community Partnership objected to any building on green spaces.

It urged the county council to insist all brownfield or previously developed sites are built on and empty properties upgraded and brought back into use instead.

Partnership chairman, Dave Farry, said: “The Durham County Plan, as agreed by the Labour-controlled council last year, identifies 300 new homes for Ferryhill.

“With outline planning permission for nearly 400 already we’ve already exceeded that allocation.

“On top of that there are over 120 void properties in Dean Bank alone.

“Ferryhill does not need all these new homes and certainly doesn’t want them on green land.”

Ferryhill town councillor Brian Gibson added: “We’ve seen other parts of Ferryhill developed and do no good for the town, we’ll end up with beautiful houses all around it while the centre deteriorates.”

Linda Foster, of South View, is against the scheme, fearing the loss of the view, which includes the Cleveland Hills, the impact of construction work and extra traffic generated by new homes.

Other objectors feel the proposed shop would be too small to boost the town’s retail and jobs offer, the fields should be protected and reducing the gap between Ferryhill and Chilton threatens its identity.

Ferryhill Community Partnership will hold a public meeting at The Eldon Arms tomorrow (Thursday May 22) at 6pm, to plan a collective response based on feedback.

Planning consultants Signet Planning will reveal more details of Story Homes’ proposal and gather local views at a public consultation event on Friday, May 23.

The drop-in event will be at Dean Bank and Ferryhill Literary Institute, St Cuthbert’s Terrace, from 2pm to 6.30pm.

Comments (7)

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8:24pm Wed 21 May 14

peter laidler says...

Good luck to all those who oppose this scheme because you will need it. Simon Henig and his cronies are obsessed with bricks and mortar. Asthetics aside, what is the sense on clearing greenbelt, and productive land at that, when there are plenty of alternative brownfield sites. To add insult to injury it will be the same old, same old, 2/3/4 bedroom homes when what is more important is social housing that families starting out can afford.
Good luck to all those who oppose this scheme because you will need it. Simon Henig and his cronies are obsessed with bricks and mortar. Asthetics aside, what is the sense on clearing greenbelt, and productive land at that, when there are plenty of alternative brownfield sites. To add insult to injury it will be the same old, same old, 2/3/4 bedroom homes when what is more important is social housing that families starting out [and others] can afford. peter laidler
  • Score: 4

9:10pm Wed 21 May 14

tubgut says...

Solution get rid of labour they are way past their sell by date and started to go off, in to the bin they go, next election do it.
Solution get rid of labour they are way past their sell by date and started to go off, in to the bin they go, next election do it. tubgut
  • Score: 3

9:44am Thu 22 May 14

reasoned view says...

Would that be a view no-one is entitled to under planning law. And remind me, is David Farry ythe councillor who was arrested for assaulting his wife?
Get on with it and build.
Would that be a view no-one is entitled to under planning law. And remind me, is David Farry ythe councillor who was arrested for assaulting his wife? Get on with it and build. reasoned view
  • Score: 0

10:29am Thu 22 May 14

bambara says...

The country needs more houses.
The NorthEast has a very high number (%) of old terraced houses.
The Northeast has a low (%) of semi-detached and detached houses.

Solution build more houses.

At approx 75% terraced houses in the NE
(apologies working on approx numbers as I can't find an accurate breakdown of the housing stock by region, only a note on the ONS that the number of Terrace houses in "more deprived areas" is approx 75% as compared to under 50% for the average)
so I am working on 75% given that much of the older stock in the towns and villages of the NE built to support the mines and heavy industry were and remain terraces.

As the NE is relatively over supplied with small Terrace houses the need is for more 2/3/4 bedroom modern houses to cater for the increasing number of small family units who are looking for this type of property.

So in summary DCC are approving planning for the type of property which is actually needed. (but I'm sure that won't stop the Tory and UKIP supporters spouting baseless propaganda)
The country needs more houses. The NorthEast has a very high number (%) of old terraced houses. The Northeast has a low (%) of semi-detached and detached houses. Solution build more houses. At approx 75% terraced houses in the NE (apologies working on approx numbers as I can't find an accurate breakdown of the housing stock by region, only a note on the ONS that the number of Terrace houses in "more deprived areas" is approx 75% as compared to under 50% for the average) so I am working on 75% given that much of the older stock in the towns and villages of the NE built to support the mines and heavy industry were and remain terraces. As the NE is relatively over supplied with small Terrace houses the need is for more 2/3/4 bedroom modern houses to cater for the increasing number of small family units who are looking for this type of property. So in summary DCC are approving planning for the type of property which is actually needed. (but I'm sure that won't stop the Tory and UKIP supporters spouting baseless propaganda) bambara
  • Score: 0

3:22pm Thu 22 May 14

ferrytruth says...

reasoned view wrote:
Would that be a view no-one is entitled to under planning law. And remind me, is David Farry ythe councillor who was arrested for assaulting his wife? Get on with it and build.
that would be the David Farry who was found not guilty on all accounts
[quote][p][bold]reasoned view[/bold] wrote: Would that be a view no-one is entitled to under planning law. And remind me, is David Farry ythe councillor who was arrested for assaulting his wife? Get on with it and build.[/p][/quote]that would be the David Farry who was found not guilty on all accounts ferrytruth
  • Score: 0

12:18pm Fri 23 May 14

peter laidler says...

Well BAMBARA, no prizes for guessing which political persuasion you lean toward. Speaking from experience there is far more than mere bricks and mortar to consider if we wish to provide suitable accommodation while at the same time trying to develop a spirit of community, provide a decent quality of life and, reduce the impact on the environment for our children's future. I was raised in a council house that by present day building standards would make you cringe, but which was lovingly looked after by my mother and I continued to live in council housing until I had saved enough to put down a deposit on a mortgage on own my own home and guess what; it was a terraced house. Don't be too judgemental when it comes to terrace housing. I acknowledge that we need to make provision for more houses, but in my view it could be done in a more environmentally friendly way with good forward planning. Pity you didn't attend the meeting in Durham Town Hall that was addressed by the eminent environmentalist Jonathon Porritt. He gave his opinion on the County's 30 year plan and I only hope your around to reap the whirlwind
Well BAMBARA, no prizes for guessing which political persuasion you lean toward. Speaking from experience there is far more than mere bricks and mortar to consider if we wish to provide suitable accommodation while at the same time trying to develop a spirit of community, provide a decent quality of life and, reduce the impact on the environment for our children's future. I was raised in a council house that by present day building standards would make you cringe, but which was lovingly looked after by my mother and I continued to live in council housing until I had saved enough to put down a deposit on a mortgage on own my own home and guess what; it was a terraced house. Don't be too judgemental when it comes to terrace housing. I acknowledge that we need to make provision for more houses, but in my view it could be done in a more environmentally friendly way with good forward planning. Pity you didn't attend the meeting in Durham Town Hall that was addressed by the eminent environmentalist Jonathon Porritt. He gave his opinion on the County's 30 year plan and I only hope your around to reap the whirlwind peter laidler
  • Score: 0

5:55pm Fri 30 May 14

pb22222 says...

I agree the country needs more a\ffordable houses.. A village like Ferryhill is a community built up over hundreds of years. People were living on the proposed building land in the 1300's.

I was brought up in a farm cottage just out of view in the picture in the 1950's We got electricity in 1956, about the same time a bathroom and flushing outside toilet were added. At that time almost all of Ferryhill's terraced houses had electricity. New council houses were being built, which were even more modern and had central heating.

Despite the closure of Dean and Chapter and Mainsforth there was still work to be had in manufacturing. industries Black and Decker,Smart and Browns, and Rothmans. Invalidiity Benefit, which was more than basic sickness benefit kept the sick miners on side. Civil Service jobs were exported from London to Durham to employ school leavers.

We worked ha\rd and wanted more than a two up, two down and saved for a deposit on a brand new house. The population of the area grew in age a\s well as number, and the "new" jobs went too. The main work is now in the service industries i.e. carers etc. These poorly paid still have high expectations, wanting to live in a new build, leaving the terraces to become almost derelict. It makes more economic sense to refurbish these homes to make them attractive to all. A happy thriving healthy community does not need new little boxes to live in, but a good work ethos,living within ones means.



I agree the country needs more a\affordable houses.. A village like Ferryhill is a community built up over hundreds of years. People were living on the proposed building land in the 1300's.
I agree the country needs more a\ffordable houses.. A village like Ferryhill is a community built up over hundreds of years. People were living on the proposed building land in the 1300's. I was brought up in a farm cottage just out of view in the picture in the 1950's We got electricity in 1956, about the same time a bathroom and flushing outside toilet were added. At that time almost all of Ferryhill's terraced houses had electricity. New council houses were being built, which were even more modern and had central heating. Despite the closure of Dean and Chapter and Mainsforth there was still work to be had in manufacturing. industries Black and Decker,Smart and Browns, and Rothmans. Invalidiity Benefit, which was more than basic sickness benefit kept the sick miners on side. Civil Service jobs were exported from London to Durham to employ school leavers. We worked ha\rd and wanted more than a two up, two down and saved for a deposit on a brand new house. The population of the area grew in age a\s well as number, and the "new" jobs went too. The main work is now in the service industries i.e. carers etc. These poorly paid still have high expectations, wanting to live in a new build, leaving the terraces to become almost derelict. It makes more economic sense to refurbish these homes to make them attractive to all. A happy thriving healthy community does not need new little boxes to live in, but a good work ethos,living within ones means. I agree the country needs more a\affordable houses.. A village like Ferryhill is a community built up over hundreds of years. People were living on the proposed building land in the 1300's. pb22222
  • Score: 0

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