Concerns raised over plans for 61-metre high turbine in Crook

The Advertiser Series: TURBINE CONCERNS: Campaigners are angry over plans to build a 61metre high turbine near to Crook. Stock image TURBINE CONCERNS: Campaigners are angry over plans to build a 61metre high turbine near to Crook. Stock image

A SCHEME for a 61-metre wind turbine has been criticised over fears that it will impact visually on the area and cause health problems.

Plans have been submitted by Mr and Mrs Hedley, of Burn Farm, in Crook, for a turbine on land near to Low Jacobs Hill, in Crook.

Durham County Council will decide whether to grant planning permission, but complaints have been raised by residents living nearby.

Objectors have written to the council to outline their fears over the turbine plans.

One objector, Ray Milliner, of Helmington Row, near Crook, said in a statement: "This development would have an oppressive and overbearing impact on the tranquillity of the area which is currently enjoyed by many local people.

"This development is much too close to residential properties in every direction and it is too close to public footpaths used extensively and enjoyed by the local community.

"There is the visual dominance too as the turbine will be 61metres to the top of the blade. Turbines can have a major affect on tourism in an area and Crook is the gateway to Weardale.

"What about the effects on local livestock and wildlife, either being killed by flying into the blades or distressed by the constant hum.

‘The possible effect on health of the noise from the turbine should be considered.

"It is an established fact that low level turbine noise can be a cause of migraine, depression and sleep disturbance.

"Many people feel intimidated by these colossal machines and that we are rapidly being hemmed in by them in this part of Durham.

"The needs of the local community and businesses should take priority over the wants of one private organisation.’

Councillor Eddie Tomlinson, who covers Crook for the county, said: “I’m against it. It’s in an area that is very close to houses and there is the visual impact and the size of it.

“I’m pretty confident it will not go ahead.”

There are also fears among the objectors that, if this plan is approved, more turbines could be sought for the site.

Another plan by Crook Golf Club for a wind turbine for Low Jobs Hill, near Crook, was passed by the county council in 2012 despite strong objections.

A comment was unavailable from the applicant or his agent at the time of going to press.

Comments (3)

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8:13pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Risk555 says...

Ah they have destroyed the countryside & scenery in the surrounding areas; stanley, sunniside, tow law etc so why not add another, the more the merrier.
Ah they have destroyed the countryside & scenery in the surrounding areas; stanley, sunniside, tow law etc so why not add another, the more the merrier. Risk555
  • Score: 1

9:12pm Thu 7 Aug 14

janice martjn says...

What a pity Cllr Tomlinson did not support the residents when they were fighting the wind turbine planning application at Crook Golf Club, instead he approved that the application be granted.
Durham County Council did not think it was necessary for the townsfolk of Crook and surrounding villages to know of this latest Wind Turbine planning application even though it will be visible to everyone. It will not stop there ,this application may state a single turbine but three have been mentioned to residents for this site.
What a pity Cllr Tomlinson did not support the residents when they were fighting the wind turbine planning application at Crook Golf Club, instead he approved that the application be granted. Durham County Council did not think it was necessary for the townsfolk of Crook and surrounding villages to know of this latest Wind Turbine planning application even though it will be visible to everyone. It will not stop there ,this application may state a single turbine but three have been mentioned to residents for this site. janice martjn
  • Score: 0

8:32am Wed 13 Aug 14

Ally F says...

I'm not against wind turbines at all, provided in scale and siting they are suitably located. I lived within 350m of a 120m tall 2MW turbine for several years, and it was of course very visible and sometimes quite audible. The white noise of the blade and whistling of the blade tips used to get significantly amplified by the terrace of properties facing it, which included my house. It was worst when the hub axis was perpendicular to the terrace. Such local factors are not considered in the planning noise assessment. They assume noise is free-field with no reflection from nearby buildings and structures. That’s seldom the case in a location where there are houses nearby. It didn't bother me as I was living in a city, with a higher level of background noise than open countryside, and the turbine was not really spoiling an open view or aspect.

The concerns about wildlife and birds flying into them are completely unfounded, as are some of the more hysterical health concerns about low frequency noise, mad dogs, migraines, etc. They are simply internet myths. You need to present more evidence-based factual objections to any planning proposal; internet myths and rumours without factual basis are immaterial from a planning evaluation perspective.

Local land owners and farmers are not building turbines a-plenty because they are tree-hugging greenies; they are building them to cash in on over-generous micro-generation feed in tariffs provided by the Government. The plethora of turbines now surrounding Crook are money-making cash cows, simple as that.

If the Government were to scrap the excessive hand-outs of cash to wind turbine owners and simply pay market wholesale rate for the electricity generated, we would see a much more balanced and proportionate approach to their planning, location and use.
I'm not against wind turbines at all, provided in scale and siting they are suitably located. I lived within 350m of a 120m tall 2MW turbine for several years, and it was of course very visible and sometimes quite audible. The white noise of the blade and whistling of the blade tips used to get significantly amplified by the terrace of properties facing it, which included my house. It was worst when the hub axis was perpendicular to the terrace. Such local factors are not considered in the planning noise assessment. They assume noise is free-field with no reflection from nearby buildings and structures. That’s seldom the case in a location where there are houses nearby. It didn't bother me as I was living in a city, with a higher level of background noise than open countryside, and the turbine was not really spoiling an open view or aspect. The concerns about wildlife and birds flying into them are completely unfounded, as are some of the more hysterical health concerns about low frequency noise, mad dogs, migraines, etc. They are simply internet myths. You need to present more evidence-based factual objections to any planning proposal; internet myths and rumours without factual basis are immaterial from a planning evaluation perspective. Local land owners and farmers are not building turbines a-plenty because they are tree-hugging greenies; they are building them to cash in on over-generous micro-generation feed in tariffs provided by the Government. The plethora of turbines now surrounding Crook are money-making cash cows, simple as that. If the Government were to scrap the excessive hand-outs of cash to wind turbine owners and simply pay market wholesale rate for the electricity generated, we would see a much more balanced and proportionate approach to their planning, location and use. Ally F
  • Score: 3

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