Disabled Darlington woman abandons court appeal on bus access rights

The Advertiser Series: COURT APPEAL: A Darlington woman has abandoned her legal case against Arriva's first come, first served policy on wheelchair bays COURT APPEAL: A Darlington woman has abandoned her legal case against Arriva's first come, first served policy on wheelchair bays

A DISABLED Darlington woman has abandoned her legal case against a bus company over its policy on spaces for wheelchair users.

ME sufferer, Jane Elliott, claimed disabled passengers were at a disadvantage as Arriva North-East operates a first come, first served policy on its wheelchair spaces.

As a result, drivers can ask those with pushchairs to move from designated spaces if a wheelchair user wants to board – but cannot insist on it.

The 60-year-old was due to have her test case heard at the Court of Appeal, in London, in November, claiming she could not board some buses because the disabled bay was occupied.

However her solicitors said she has been forced to drop the case because of civil justice reforms, which leaves claimants “at a substantial personal financial risk when bringing discrimination cases”.

Her solicitor, Chris Fry, of Unity Law, said the reforms, introduced in April 2013, meant Mrs Elliott would be liable to pay Arriva’s costs – said to be £150,000 – in the event she was unsuccessful following the two-day appeal.

He also said that had she won, Mrs Elliott would have to pay an insurance premium of more than £120,000.

He added: “If disabled claimants can’t hold service providers to account for what they perceive as discriminatory practices, it renders the Equality Act obsolete and breaches fundamental human rights which are likely to be the subject of further legal action.”

The appeal was in response to a ruling at Middlesbrough County Court which found Arriva had not breached the Equality Act following an incident in 2011.

Judge Peter Bowers had rejected Mrs Elliott's claim for damages, saying she had not suffered a substantial disadvantage because she was able to board the next bus.

He also found that Arriva's policy of asking mothers with pushchairs to move, but not insisting that they do so, was a reasonable adjustment to make for the benefit of disabled passengers.

Nigel Featham, regional managing director for Arriva North-East, said the firm was committed to making buses as accessible as possible.

“We are always open and willing to discuss issues affecting people with disabilities,” he said.

“We were disappointed this matter ever went to court but welcomed Judge Bowers’ decision when it was issued in May 2013.”

Meanwhile, a further appeal against First Bus Group will still go ahead.

In September, a judge at Leeds County Court ruled the firm’s first come, first served policy had substantially disadvantaged a wheelchair user and was unlawful discrimination in breach of the Equality Act 2010.

First Bus Group is appealing the decision and a ruling is due in November.

Comments (28)

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4:56pm Tue 26 Aug 14

Triglet says...

She did nt have a leg to stand on , They make it so difficult and financially hard for potential claimants so it cant open any loop holes
She did nt have a leg to stand on , They make it so difficult and financially hard for potential claimants so it cant open any loop holes Triglet
  • Score: -10

4:57pm Tue 26 Aug 14

joeninety says...

youngcrony

Why don't you tie your legs together for a day and see how you manage to get around.
The spaces taken up on buses by what are actually collapsible push chairs should have the sense to make way for wheelchairs without been asked to do so. The space on the bus is clearly marked for wheelchairs and not pushchairs.
youngcrony Why don't you tie your legs together for a day and see how you manage to get around. The spaces taken up on buses by what are actually collapsible push chairs should have the sense to make way for wheelchairs without been asked to do so. The space on the bus is clearly marked for wheelchairs and not pushchairs. joeninety
  • Score: 8

5:01pm Tue 26 Aug 14

youngcrony says...

joeninety wrote:
youngcrony

Why don't you tie your legs together for a day and see how you manage to get around.
The spaces taken up on buses by what are actually collapsible push chairs should have the sense to make way for wheelchairs without been asked to do so. The space on the bus is clearly marked for wheelchairs and not pushchairs.
Are you saying we should waste a space and deny a pram user the space, just in case a wheelchair boards the bus? Because that really makes sense, doesn't it....!

Welcome to today's Britain of **** footing around others less able than us and allowing them to interrupt our normal lives.
[quote][p][bold]joeninety[/bold] wrote: youngcrony Why don't you tie your legs together for a day and see how you manage to get around. The spaces taken up on buses by what are actually collapsible push chairs should have the sense to make way for wheelchairs without been asked to do so. The space on the bus is clearly marked for wheelchairs and not pushchairs.[/p][/quote]Are you saying we should waste a space and deny a pram user the space, just in case a wheelchair boards the bus? Because that really makes sense, doesn't it....! Welcome to today's Britain of **** footing around others less able than us and allowing them to interrupt our normal lives. youngcrony
  • Score: -4

5:01pm Tue 26 Aug 14

youngcrony says...

Triglet wrote:
She did nt have a leg to stand on , They make it so difficult and financially hard for potential claimants so it cant open any loop holes
"She did nt have a leg to stand on" - there's a joke in there somewhere, I'm sure of it.
[quote][p][bold]Triglet[/bold] wrote: She did nt have a leg to stand on , They make it so difficult and financially hard for potential claimants so it cant open any loop holes[/p][/quote]"She did nt have a leg to stand on" - there's a joke in there somewhere, I'm sure of it. youngcrony
  • Score: -5

6:23pm Tue 26 Aug 14

loan_star says...

If you are able bodied and the bus is full you can't get on. If there is no room for another wheelchair then they can't get on. Simple as that. The world is a **** sometimes but we all have to make allowances at some point, able bodied or not.
If you are able bodied and the bus is full you can't get on. If there is no room for another wheelchair then they can't get on. Simple as that. The world is a **** sometimes but we all have to make allowances at some point, able bodied or not. loan_star
  • Score: 6

7:22pm Tue 26 Aug 14

maclaren says...

youngcrony wrote:
More like she saw sense!

What gives the disabled the right to pus people out the way when it suits them, yet we should be seen as entirely accommodating to them? What's wrong them accommodating for normal people? Or how about a little common sense and take the rough the smooth like we all have to in real life?

It won't be long until Gordon Pybus sticks his oar in and chew his best pall's (Bill Dixon) ear off. As a result, he will want the entire of Darlington level so there isn't a single hill, kerb or bump. Why? For the whinging disabled people of course.

I'd be interested in learning how the disabled intend to pay for all the changes they demand of us. i don't suppose they'd like to chip in, would they? No...didn't think so!
Absolutely spot on youngcrony
[quote][p][bold]youngcrony[/bold] wrote: More like she saw sense! What gives the disabled the right to pus people out the way when it suits them, yet we should be seen as entirely accommodating to them? What's wrong them accommodating for normal people? Or how about a little common sense and take the rough the smooth like we all have to in real life? It won't be long until Gordon Pybus sticks his oar in and chew his best pall's (Bill Dixon) ear off. As a result, he will want the entire of Darlington level so there isn't a single hill, kerb or bump. Why? For the whinging disabled people of course. I'd be interested in learning how the disabled intend to pay for all the changes they demand of us. i don't suppose they'd like to chip in, would they? No...didn't think so![/p][/quote]Absolutely spot on youngcrony maclaren
  • Score: -3

7:59pm Tue 26 Aug 14

stevegg says...

ahh, so if it was legal aid money (eg taxpayer funded) then it would have gone ahead at huge cost to us! Legal aid funding was long overdue for reform which was seen as a cash cow for solicitors and an endless pot of money to pursue ridiculous cases by those entitled to it (which bizarely included millionaires) who wouldnt let anything go as long as they knew they were not footing the bill!
ahh, so if it was legal aid money (eg taxpayer funded) then it would have gone ahead at huge cost to us! Legal aid funding was long overdue for reform which was seen as a cash cow for solicitors and an endless pot of money to pursue ridiculous cases by those entitled to it (which bizarely included millionaires) who wouldnt let anything go as long as they knew they were not footing the bill! stevegg
  • Score: 7

8:59pm Tue 26 Aug 14

joeninety says...

youngcrony wrote:
joeninety wrote:
youngcrony

Why don't you tie your legs together for a day and see how you manage to get around.
The spaces taken up on buses by what are actually collapsible push chairs should have the sense to make way for wheelchairs without been asked to do so. The space on the bus is clearly marked for wheelchairs and not pushchairs.
Are you saying we should waste a space and deny a pram user the space, just in case a wheelchair boards the bus? Because that really makes sense, doesn't it....!

Welcome to today's Britain of **** footing around others less able than us and allowing them to interrupt our normal lives.
No, I'm not saying don't use the space if there isn't a wheelchair requiring it. But they should be prepared to vacate the space if it is needed by a wheelchair user. 99% of the pushchairs are collapsible.
The re-design of the buses (from steps to walk on) was brought about by legislation to facilitate wheelchair users, not pushchairs.
[quote][p][bold]youngcrony[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]joeninety[/bold] wrote: youngcrony Why don't you tie your legs together for a day and see how you manage to get around. The spaces taken up on buses by what are actually collapsible push chairs should have the sense to make way for wheelchairs without been asked to do so. The space on the bus is clearly marked for wheelchairs and not pushchairs.[/p][/quote]Are you saying we should waste a space and deny a pram user the space, just in case a wheelchair boards the bus? Because that really makes sense, doesn't it....! Welcome to today's Britain of **** footing around others less able than us and allowing them to interrupt our normal lives.[/p][/quote]No, I'm not saying don't use the space if there isn't a wheelchair requiring it. But they should be prepared to vacate the space if it is needed by a wheelchair user. 99% of the pushchairs are collapsible. The re-design of the buses (from steps to walk on) was brought about by legislation to facilitate wheelchair users, not pushchairs. joeninety
  • Score: 9

10:33pm Tue 26 Aug 14

Teesflyer says...

Finally a decision to support the changes against the ambulance chasing insurance charlatans usually involved in these cases. What case did she think Arriva had to answer? - that they couldn't GUARANTEE her a space on any bus she cared to travel on - sorry, but that's just the way it is. If there were a smaller number of buses, just for the disabled, the waiting time would be just as great. Life is not perfect and whilst I sympathise with her situation we have to admit that we can't have utopia for all and that everyone makes compromises in their daily life no matter what their circumstances.
Finally a decision to support the changes against the ambulance chasing insurance charlatans usually involved in these cases. What case did she think Arriva had to answer? - that they couldn't GUARANTEE her a space on any bus she cared to travel on - sorry, but that's just the way it is. If there were a smaller number of buses, just for the disabled, the waiting time would be just as great. Life is not perfect and whilst I sympathise with her situation we have to admit that we can't have utopia for all and that everyone makes compromises in their daily life no matter what their circumstances. Teesflyer
  • Score: 6

10:44am Wed 27 Aug 14

latsot says...

There are some charming people here, aren't there? I expected the outrage in the comments to be aimed at the people who use wheelchair spaces (on busses and elsewhere) when they don't need to. I thought people would be surprised and angered at the fact that people refuse to give up a wheelchair space to a wheelchair user when they have other options and the wheelchair user does not.

Instead, there's a page of vitriol against wheelchair users, as if they choose to be in the chair and wish to deprive the able bodied of the thirty-odd seats on the bus they are able to use.

Wheelchair users have fewer options than the able bodied for work, transport and for life in general. The rest of us don't need to do or spend very much to help level the playing field a little. One seat on a bus, a ramp here and there and a bit of common decency go quite a long way and are hardly a great sacrifice for the rest of us.
There are some charming people here, aren't there? I expected the outrage in the comments to be aimed at the people who use wheelchair spaces (on busses and elsewhere) when they don't need to. I thought people would be surprised and angered at the fact that people refuse to give up a wheelchair space to a wheelchair user when they have other options and the wheelchair user does not. Instead, there's a page of vitriol against wheelchair users, as if they choose to be in the chair and wish to deprive the able bodied of the thirty-odd seats on the bus they are able to use. Wheelchair users have fewer options than the able bodied for work, transport and for life in general. The rest of us don't need to do or spend very much to help level the playing field a little. One seat on a bus, a ramp here and there and a bit of common decency go quite a long way and are hardly a great sacrifice for the rest of us. latsot
  • Score: 10

11:01am Wed 27 Aug 14

youngcrony says...

latsot, perhaps the disabled should spend less time being miserable and obstinate all the time and stopped racing round the streets with disregard for everybody except for themselves. Maybe then people might be more supportive of them.

Do you really think a parent should move from a place when they were there first? Do you really expect the parent and child to get off the bus for the sake of one person?

First come first served.
latsot, perhaps the disabled should spend less time being miserable and obstinate all the time and stopped racing round the streets with disregard for everybody except for themselves. Maybe then people might be more supportive of them. Do you really think a parent should move from a place when they were there first? Do you really expect the parent and child to get off the bus for the sake of one person? First come first served. youngcrony
  • Score: -4

12:44pm Wed 27 Aug 14

darloboss says...

youngcrony wrote:
latsot, perhaps the disabled should spend less time being miserable and obstinate all the time and stopped racing round the streets with disregard for everybody except for themselves. Maybe then people might be more supportive of them.

Do you really think a parent should move from a place when they were there first? Do you really expect the parent and child to get off the bus for the sake of one person?

First come first served.
the disabled people i work with are some of the happiest people you could wish to meet thay dont want special teatment just a fair crack of the whip its selfish sour faced people like you that need a bit of civility and compassion
[quote][p][bold]youngcrony[/bold] wrote: latsot, perhaps the disabled should spend less time being miserable and obstinate all the time and stopped racing round the streets with disregard for everybody except for themselves. Maybe then people might be more supportive of them. Do you really think a parent should move from a place when they were there first? Do you really expect the parent and child to get off the bus for the sake of one person? First come first served.[/p][/quote]the disabled people i work with are some of the happiest people you could wish to meet thay dont want special teatment just a fair crack of the whip its selfish sour faced people like you that need a bit of civility and compassion darloboss
  • Score: 10

1:02pm Wed 27 Aug 14

chansm79 says...

My personal take on this is that if the bus is full - and I mean full, as in all standing capacity taken, and the drop down seats within the disabled area taken - then the wheelchair cannot take precedence as it would mean turfing off around 4-5 people from the bus.

However, as mentioned previously, pushchairs are collapsable, and are made to be folded on public transport. If it is feasible for the buggy to be folded, and there is room for the parent and child to move to elsewhere on the bus, then there should be no reason why the disabled user should not be allowed to use the space!
My personal take on this is that if the bus is full - and I mean full, as in all standing capacity taken, and the drop down seats within the disabled area taken - then the wheelchair cannot take precedence as it would mean turfing off around 4-5 people from the bus. However, as mentioned previously, pushchairs are collapsable, and are made to be folded on public transport. If it is feasible for the buggy to be folded, and there is room for the parent and child to move to elsewhere on the bus, then there should be no reason why the disabled user should not be allowed to use the space! chansm79
  • Score: 11

2:36pm Wed 27 Aug 14

latsot says...

@youngcrony:

I think anybody should move from the designated disabled spot if a disabled person needs it, yes.

Parents often have a difficult time transporting young children. They have to keep them entertained. They have to try to prevent them from annoying other people and they have to wrestle with equipment such as pushchairs which can be hard to handle. By all means, parents should use the wheelchair spaces to make their journey easier, providing there's no wheelchair user who needs to use that space.

Wheelchair users don't have that choice. They don't occupy that space on the bus because it's easier, but because it's the only space there is. The chronically ill don't occupy hospital beds to prevent healthy people from lying down, either.

I know I won't convince you, but I hope I can convince some others that you're a horrible person with a disgraceful opinion, devoid of dignity, compassion and logic.
@youngcrony: I think anybody should move from the designated disabled spot if a disabled person needs it, yes. Parents often have a difficult time transporting young children. They have to keep them entertained. They have to try to prevent them from annoying other people and they have to wrestle with equipment such as pushchairs which can be hard to handle. By all means, parents should use the wheelchair spaces to make their journey easier, providing there's no wheelchair user who needs to use that space. Wheelchair users don't have that choice. They don't occupy that space on the bus because it's easier, but because it's the only space there is. The chronically ill don't occupy hospital beds to prevent healthy people from lying down, either. I know I won't convince you, but I hope I can convince some others that you're a horrible person with a disgraceful opinion, devoid of dignity, compassion and logic. latsot
  • Score: 15

3:06pm Wed 27 Aug 14

darloboss says...

latsot wrote:
@youngcrony:

I think anybody should move from the designated disabled spot if a disabled person needs it, yes.

Parents often have a difficult time transporting young children. They have to keep them entertained. They have to try to prevent them from annoying other people and they have to wrestle with equipment such as pushchairs which can be hard to handle. By all means, parents should use the wheelchair spaces to make their journey easier, providing there's no wheelchair user who needs to use that space.

Wheelchair users don't have that choice. They don't occupy that space on the bus because it's easier, but because it's the only space there is. The chronically ill don't occupy hospital beds to prevent healthy people from lying down, either.

I know I won't convince you, but I hope I can convince some others that you're a horrible person with a disgraceful opinion, devoid of dignity, compassion and logic.
well said latsot a big thumbs up from me
[quote][p][bold]latsot[/bold] wrote: @youngcrony: I think anybody should move from the designated disabled spot if a disabled person needs it, yes. Parents often have a difficult time transporting young children. They have to keep them entertained. They have to try to prevent them from annoying other people and they have to wrestle with equipment such as pushchairs which can be hard to handle. By all means, parents should use the wheelchair spaces to make their journey easier, providing there's no wheelchair user who needs to use that space. Wheelchair users don't have that choice. They don't occupy that space on the bus because it's easier, but because it's the only space there is. The chronically ill don't occupy hospital beds to prevent healthy people from lying down, either. I know I won't convince you, but I hope I can convince some others that you're a horrible person with a disgraceful opinion, devoid of dignity, compassion and logic.[/p][/quote]well said latsot a big thumbs up from me darloboss
  • Score: 12

5:05pm Wed 27 Aug 14

joeninety says...

@youngcrony:
By your name I presume you are of the younger generation, which only makes me and many others despair at your selfish, egotistic attitude and manners. God help what the next generation will be like if you are an example of todays.
I think you will find that the one's that go racing round the streets are the ones who aren't totally disabled, just to lazy to walk. My experience of people who cant use their legs at all is one of civility and regard for other pedestrians and travellers. The thing that makes them miserable is people of your contemptible ilk who have no respect or manners.
@youngcrony: By your name I presume you are of the younger generation, which only makes me and many others despair at your selfish, egotistic attitude and manners. God help what the next generation will be like if you are an example of todays. I think you will find that the one's that go racing round the streets are the ones who aren't totally disabled, just to lazy to walk. My experience of people who cant use their legs at all is one of civility and regard for other pedestrians and travellers. The thing that makes them miserable is people of your contemptible ilk who have no respect or manners. joeninety
  • Score: 11

6:30pm Thu 28 Aug 14

maclaren says...

George BA wrote:
youngcrony wrote:
More like she saw sense!

What gives the disabled the right to pus people out the way when it suits them, yet we should be seen as entirely accommodating to them? What's wrong them accommodating for normal people? Or how about a little common sense and take the rough the smooth like we all have to in real life?

It won't be long until Gordon Pybus sticks his oar in and chew his best pall's (Bill Dixon) ear off. As a result, he will want the entire of Darlington level so there isn't a single hill, kerb or bump. Why? For the whinging disabled people of course.

I'd be interested in learning how the disabled intend to pay for all the changes they demand of us. i don't suppose they'd like to chip in, would they? No...didn't think so!
what a biggot, 'accomodating 'normal' people, whinging disabled. Who the hell do you thnk you are.

Disability hatred, is a criminal offence, so guess who I will be complaining to. On top of this have you ever heard of the equalit act.

BTW normal is a cyle on some washing mahines.
Shut the hell up
[quote][p][bold]George BA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]youngcrony[/bold] wrote: More like she saw sense! What gives the disabled the right to pus people out the way when it suits them, yet we should be seen as entirely accommodating to them? What's wrong them accommodating for normal people? Or how about a little common sense and take the rough the smooth like we all have to in real life? It won't be long until Gordon Pybus sticks his oar in and chew his best pall's (Bill Dixon) ear off. As a result, he will want the entire of Darlington level so there isn't a single hill, kerb or bump. Why? For the whinging disabled people of course. I'd be interested in learning how the disabled intend to pay for all the changes they demand of us. i don't suppose they'd like to chip in, would they? No...didn't think so![/p][/quote]what a biggot, 'accomodating 'normal' people, whinging disabled. Who the hell do you thnk you are. Disability hatred, is a criminal offence, so guess who I will be complaining to. On top of this have you ever heard of the equalit act. BTW normal is a cyle on some washing mahines.[/p][/quote]Shut the hell up maclaren
  • Score: -11

6:46pm Thu 28 Aug 14

maclaren says...

Let me tell you about the equality act I had to spend £75000 installing a wheelchair platform lift in my offices because I had erected a mezzanine floor this was to comply with building regulations in 18 months nobody has used it because if I chose to employ a person in a wheelchair which I would only do on there merits not there disability I would have accommodated them at ground floor level the world has gone mad now I am struggling to recoup that £75000 outlay probably going to have to lay staff off because of this times are hard for business and this insane legislation does not help
Let me tell you about the equality act I had to spend £75000 installing a wheelchair platform lift in my offices because I had erected a mezzanine floor this was to comply with building regulations in 18 months nobody has used it because if I chose to employ a person in a wheelchair which I would only do on there merits not there disability I would have accommodated them at ground floor level the world has gone mad now I am struggling to recoup that £75000 outlay probably going to have to lay staff off because of this times are hard for business and this insane legislation does not help maclaren
  • Score: -1

7:56pm Thu 28 Aug 14

victorjames says...

youngcrony wrote:
latsot, perhaps the disabled should spend less time being miserable and obstinate all the time and stopped racing round the streets with disregard for everybody except for themselves. Maybe then people might be more supportive of them.

Do you really think a parent should move from a place when they were there first? Do you really expect the parent and child to get off the bus for the sake of one person?

First come first served.
You're a real charmer aren't you. I do hope that you're never become disabled yourself. What a selfish moron.
[quote][p][bold]youngcrony[/bold] wrote: latsot, perhaps the disabled should spend less time being miserable and obstinate all the time and stopped racing round the streets with disregard for everybody except for themselves. Maybe then people might be more supportive of them. Do you really think a parent should move from a place when they were there first? Do you really expect the parent and child to get off the bus for the sake of one person? First come first served.[/p][/quote]You're a real charmer aren't you. I do hope that you're never become disabled yourself. What a selfish moron. victorjames
  • Score: 6

8:49pm Thu 28 Aug 14

LUSTARD says...

latsot wrote:
There are some charming people here, aren't there? I expected the outrage in the comments to be aimed at the people who use wheelchair spaces (on busses and elsewhere) when they don't need to. I thought people would be surprised and angered at the fact that people refuse to give up a wheelchair space to a wheelchair user when they have other options and the wheelchair user does not.

Instead, there's a page of vitriol against wheelchair users, as if they choose to be in the chair and wish to deprive the able bodied of the thirty-odd seats on the bus they are able to use.

Wheelchair users have fewer options than the able bodied for work, transport and for life in general. The rest of us don't need to do or spend very much to help level the playing field a little. One seat on a bus, a ramp here and there and a bit of common decency go quite a long way and are hardly a great sacrifice for the rest of us.
well put
[quote][p][bold]latsot[/bold] wrote: There are some charming people here, aren't there? I expected the outrage in the comments to be aimed at the people who use wheelchair spaces (on busses and elsewhere) when they don't need to. I thought people would be surprised and angered at the fact that people refuse to give up a wheelchair space to a wheelchair user when they have other options and the wheelchair user does not. Instead, there's a page of vitriol against wheelchair users, as if they choose to be in the chair and wish to deprive the able bodied of the thirty-odd seats on the bus they are able to use. Wheelchair users have fewer options than the able bodied for work, transport and for life in general. The rest of us don't need to do or spend very much to help level the playing field a little. One seat on a bus, a ramp here and there and a bit of common decency go quite a long way and are hardly a great sacrifice for the rest of us.[/p][/quote]well put LUSTARD
  • Score: 9

11:46pm Fri 29 Aug 14

Risk555 says...

Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education.
Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education. Risk555
  • Score: -3

11:54pm Fri 29 Aug 14

joeninety says...

Risk555 wrote:
Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education.
The bus passes can't be used till after 9.30 am, way past the time any workers or colleges should be at there places. Typical nit picking by the selfish brigade
[quote][p][bold]Risk555[/bold] wrote: Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education.[/p][/quote]The bus passes can't be used till after 9.30 am, way past the time any workers or colleges should be at there places. Typical nit picking by the selfish brigade joeninety
  • Score: 8

1:54pm Sat 30 Aug 14

Risk555 says...

joeninety wrote:
Risk555 wrote:
Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education.
The bus passes can't be used till after 9.30 am, way past the time any workers or colleges should be at there places. Typical nit picking by the selfish brigade
And what about people who need to commute home? Its about time we followed the lead of other parts of the country & charged OAPs for using buses between 4-6
[quote][p][bold]joeninety[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Risk555[/bold] wrote: Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education.[/p][/quote]The bus passes can't be used till after 9.30 am, way past the time any workers or colleges should be at there places. Typical nit picking by the selfish brigade[/p][/quote]And what about people who need to commute home? Its about time we followed the lead of other parts of the country & charged OAPs for using buses between 4-6 Risk555
  • Score: -4

5:17pm Sat 30 Aug 14

joeninety says...

Risk555 wrote:
joeninety wrote:
Risk555 wrote:
Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education.
The bus passes can't be used till after 9.30 am, way past the time any workers or colleges should be at there places. Typical nit picking by the selfish brigade
And what about people who need to commute home? Its about time we followed the lead of other parts of the country & charged OAPs for using buses between 4-6
I would slightly agree with a limit at the busiest time around teatime; but not 2 hours. The idea was for off peak usage but why stop being able to use passes after 11pm, certainly not peak travel time.
[quote][p][bold]Risk555[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]joeninety[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Risk555[/bold] wrote: Now can we have a debate about OAPs taking the michael with their bus passes using them for menial reasons oblivious as to the cost to the tax payer? Sick of seeing buses rammed with pensioners at peak times who couldnt care less about those commuting from work/higher education.[/p][/quote]The bus passes can't be used till after 9.30 am, way past the time any workers or colleges should be at there places. Typical nit picking by the selfish brigade[/p][/quote]And what about people who need to commute home? Its about time we followed the lead of other parts of the country & charged OAPs for using buses between 4-6[/p][/quote]I would slightly agree with a limit at the busiest time around teatime; but not 2 hours. The idea was for off peak usage but why stop being able to use passes after 11pm, certainly not peak travel time. joeninety
  • Score: 0

6:00am Sun 31 Aug 14

johnny_p says...

Are disabled people really so poorly provided for? For example there are plenty of disabled parking spaces provided in car parks and yet 70% of them seem to be unoccupied.

We live in a crowded World, and have to accept that as individuals we can't always have our own way.
Are disabled people really so poorly provided for? For example there are plenty of disabled parking spaces provided in car parks and yet 70% of them seem to be unoccupied. We live in a crowded World, and have to accept that as individuals we can't always have our own way. johnny_p
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Sun 31 Aug 14

joeninety says...

johnny_p wrote:
Are disabled people really so poorly provided for? For example there are plenty of disabled parking spaces provided in car parks and yet 70% of them seem to be unoccupied.

We live in a crowded World, and have to accept that as individuals we can't always have our own way.
There is only one space on the buses for wheelchair users; so it isn't a lot to ask for; to be able to use it when needed. If already occupied by a wheelchair then no other wheelchair can use that bus. It isn't matter of disabled persons having there own way.
And not every disabled wheelchair user can drive and in my experience most of the times the parking bays, especially outside shops and supermarkets, are taken by people able to walk, but are too idle. They would drive their cars into the stores if they could.
[quote][p][bold]johnny_p[/bold] wrote: Are disabled people really so poorly provided for? For example there are plenty of disabled parking spaces provided in car parks and yet 70% of them seem to be unoccupied. We live in a crowded World, and have to accept that as individuals we can't always have our own way.[/p][/quote]There is only one space on the buses for wheelchair users; so it isn't a lot to ask for; to be able to use it when needed. If already occupied by a wheelchair then no other wheelchair can use that bus. It isn't matter of disabled persons having there own way. And not every disabled wheelchair user can drive and in my experience most of the times the parking bays, especially outside shops and supermarkets, are taken by people able to walk, but are too idle. They would drive their cars into the stores if they could. joeninety
  • Score: 5

8:20am Mon 1 Sep 14

Jonn says...

As usual, people with plenty to say about those less fortunate than themselves but when articles appear in the Echo about those at the top of society taking the pi$$, they are strangely silent.
What a dark, miserable world some folk live in that they are full of venom for wheelchair users.
This Government have helped create a situation where everyone is looking down to vent their frustrations when they should be looking up.
As usual, people with plenty to say about those less fortunate than themselves but when articles appear in the Echo about those at the top of society taking the pi$$, they are strangely silent. What a dark, miserable world some folk live in that they are full of venom for wheelchair users. This Government have helped create a situation where everyone is looking down to vent their frustrations when they should be looking up. Jonn
  • Score: 3

11:31pm Mon 1 Sep 14

darloboss says...

maclaren wrote:
Let me tell you about the equality act I had to spend £75000 installing a wheelchair platform lift in my offices because I had erected a mezzanine floor this was to comply with building regulations in 18 months nobody has used it because if I chose to employ a person in a wheelchair which I would only do on there merits not there disability I would have accommodated them at ground floor level the world has gone mad now I am struggling to recoup that £75000 outlay probably going to have to lay staff off because of this times are hard for business and this insane legislation does not help
think you got carried away with the noughts either that or you have been taken to the cleaners
[quote][p][bold]maclaren[/bold] wrote: Let me tell you about the equality act I had to spend £75000 installing a wheelchair platform lift in my offices because I had erected a mezzanine floor this was to comply with building regulations in 18 months nobody has used it because if I chose to employ a person in a wheelchair which I would only do on there merits not there disability I would have accommodated them at ground floor level the world has gone mad now I am struggling to recoup that £75000 outlay probably going to have to lay staff off because of this times are hard for business and this insane legislation does not help[/p][/quote]think you got carried away with the noughts either that or you have been taken to the cleaners darloboss
  • Score: 2
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